sz.toflyintheworld.com
New recipes

We Can’t Stop Making This 2-Ingredient Watermelon Sorbet

We Can’t Stop Making This 2-Ingredient Watermelon Sorbet


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.


And it’s nutritionist-approved, because we asked one

istockphoto.com

It's the perfect way to say goodbye to summer

We’re not kidding: You need to make this while you can. With just two healthy, low-calorie ingredients, you can make a huge bowl of tangy sorbet — and eat the whole thing without feeling sick or gross.

Regular sorbet can contain upwards of 34 grams of sugar per cup. This variety has less than half that. Incredible.

We found it on the Instagram of one of the nutritionists we recommend following on social media. Dana Harrison, MS, filmed herself raving about the stuff, diving face-first into a bowl. We trusted the nutritionist’s advice, so we hunted the recipe creator down.

Kelly Nardo, Cross Fit enthusiast and owner of a healthy meal delivery company, was tired of the artificial sweeteners and added sugar in her favorite dessert foods. Instead of just omitting the creamy confections from her diet, she decided to take action. Thus, the watermelon sorbet was born.

To make healthy eating as seamless as possible for her readers, Nardo crafted a recipe that doesn’t require any fancy equipment, technical skill, or culinary finesse, which you can find here. All you have to do is throw the two ingredients — watermelon and lime juice — into a blender and voila. Five hours of freezer time later, you’ve got the thirst-quenching snack you’ve been looking for.

In case that was too complicated for you, she also made a video to guide you to the poolside snack of your dreams.

This is the ultimate summer snack to spoon by the pool. Watermelon is super hydrating, helps with muscle recovery, and doesn’t even bloat your belly.


One-Ingredient Watermelon Sorbet

It&rsquos that time of year again. You know, when you&rsquove stopped blow-drying your hair, you&rsquore hardly wearing shoes and you haven&rsquot turned on your oven in weeks. We have an even better way to cool off, and it&rsquos called one-ingredient watermelon sorbet. It sounds too good to be true, but we promise it&rsquos not.

Just freeze a cubed watermelon until it&rsquos solid, blend it into a smooth puree, pack the puree into a pan and then freeze again. Before you know it, the sorbet is ready to scoop and enjoy, and you didn&rsquot even have to fuss with simple syrup. We predict you&rsquoll be making this one all summer long. Psst: We think seeded watermelons have better flavor, but if you can&rsquot be bothered with seeds, pick one that&rsquos seedless. Not sure how to cube a watermelon? Use our guide.

1 ripe medium watermelon, peeled, cubed and seeded

1. Arrange the watermelon cubes in an even layer on a baking sheet. Transfer the baking sheet to the freezer and freeze until the watermelon is solid, about 2 hours.

2. Working in batches, transfer the watermelon cubes to a blender or food processor and puree until smooth.

3. Divide the puree among two loaf pans (or put it all in one deep baking dish), packing it down as you add more on top.

4. Transfer the pans to the freezer. Freeze until the sorbet is scoopable, 1 to 2 hours more. To serve, scoop the sorbet into dishes and eat immediately.

Note: The information shown is Edamam's estimate based on available ingredients and preparation. It should not be considered a substitute for a professional nutritionist's advice.


One-Ingredient Watermelon Sorbet

It&rsquos that time of year again. You know, when you&rsquove stopped blow-drying your hair, you&rsquore hardly wearing shoes and you haven&rsquot turned on your oven in weeks. We have an even better way to cool off, and it&rsquos called one-ingredient watermelon sorbet. It sounds too good to be true, but we promise it&rsquos not.

Just freeze a cubed watermelon until it&rsquos solid, blend it into a smooth puree, pack the puree into a pan and then freeze again. Before you know it, the sorbet is ready to scoop and enjoy, and you didn&rsquot even have to fuss with simple syrup. We predict you&rsquoll be making this one all summer long. Psst: We think seeded watermelons have better flavor, but if you can&rsquot be bothered with seeds, pick one that&rsquos seedless. Not sure how to cube a watermelon? Use our guide.

1 ripe medium watermelon, peeled, cubed and seeded

1. Arrange the watermelon cubes in an even layer on a baking sheet. Transfer the baking sheet to the freezer and freeze until the watermelon is solid, about 2 hours.

2. Working in batches, transfer the watermelon cubes to a blender or food processor and puree until smooth.

3. Divide the puree among two loaf pans (or put it all in one deep baking dish), packing it down as you add more on top.

4. Transfer the pans to the freezer. Freeze until the sorbet is scoopable, 1 to 2 hours more. To serve, scoop the sorbet into dishes and eat immediately.

Note: The information shown is Edamam's estimate based on available ingredients and preparation. It should not be considered a substitute for a professional nutritionist's advice.


One-Ingredient Watermelon Sorbet

It&rsquos that time of year again. You know, when you&rsquove stopped blow-drying your hair, you&rsquore hardly wearing shoes and you haven&rsquot turned on your oven in weeks. We have an even better way to cool off, and it&rsquos called one-ingredient watermelon sorbet. It sounds too good to be true, but we promise it&rsquos not.

Just freeze a cubed watermelon until it&rsquos solid, blend it into a smooth puree, pack the puree into a pan and then freeze again. Before you know it, the sorbet is ready to scoop and enjoy, and you didn&rsquot even have to fuss with simple syrup. We predict you&rsquoll be making this one all summer long. Psst: We think seeded watermelons have better flavor, but if you can&rsquot be bothered with seeds, pick one that&rsquos seedless. Not sure how to cube a watermelon? Use our guide.

1 ripe medium watermelon, peeled, cubed and seeded

1. Arrange the watermelon cubes in an even layer on a baking sheet. Transfer the baking sheet to the freezer and freeze until the watermelon is solid, about 2 hours.

2. Working in batches, transfer the watermelon cubes to a blender or food processor and puree until smooth.

3. Divide the puree among two loaf pans (or put it all in one deep baking dish), packing it down as you add more on top.

4. Transfer the pans to the freezer. Freeze until the sorbet is scoopable, 1 to 2 hours more. To serve, scoop the sorbet into dishes and eat immediately.

Note: The information shown is Edamam's estimate based on available ingredients and preparation. It should not be considered a substitute for a professional nutritionist's advice.


One-Ingredient Watermelon Sorbet

It&rsquos that time of year again. You know, when you&rsquove stopped blow-drying your hair, you&rsquore hardly wearing shoes and you haven&rsquot turned on your oven in weeks. We have an even better way to cool off, and it&rsquos called one-ingredient watermelon sorbet. It sounds too good to be true, but we promise it&rsquos not.

Just freeze a cubed watermelon until it&rsquos solid, blend it into a smooth puree, pack the puree into a pan and then freeze again. Before you know it, the sorbet is ready to scoop and enjoy, and you didn&rsquot even have to fuss with simple syrup. We predict you&rsquoll be making this one all summer long. Psst: We think seeded watermelons have better flavor, but if you can&rsquot be bothered with seeds, pick one that&rsquos seedless. Not sure how to cube a watermelon? Use our guide.

1 ripe medium watermelon, peeled, cubed and seeded

1. Arrange the watermelon cubes in an even layer on a baking sheet. Transfer the baking sheet to the freezer and freeze until the watermelon is solid, about 2 hours.

2. Working in batches, transfer the watermelon cubes to a blender or food processor and puree until smooth.

3. Divide the puree among two loaf pans (or put it all in one deep baking dish), packing it down as you add more on top.

4. Transfer the pans to the freezer. Freeze until the sorbet is scoopable, 1 to 2 hours more. To serve, scoop the sorbet into dishes and eat immediately.

Note: The information shown is Edamam's estimate based on available ingredients and preparation. It should not be considered a substitute for a professional nutritionist's advice.


One-Ingredient Watermelon Sorbet

It&rsquos that time of year again. You know, when you&rsquove stopped blow-drying your hair, you&rsquore hardly wearing shoes and you haven&rsquot turned on your oven in weeks. We have an even better way to cool off, and it&rsquos called one-ingredient watermelon sorbet. It sounds too good to be true, but we promise it&rsquos not.

Just freeze a cubed watermelon until it&rsquos solid, blend it into a smooth puree, pack the puree into a pan and then freeze again. Before you know it, the sorbet is ready to scoop and enjoy, and you didn&rsquot even have to fuss with simple syrup. We predict you&rsquoll be making this one all summer long. Psst: We think seeded watermelons have better flavor, but if you can&rsquot be bothered with seeds, pick one that&rsquos seedless. Not sure how to cube a watermelon? Use our guide.

1 ripe medium watermelon, peeled, cubed and seeded

1. Arrange the watermelon cubes in an even layer on a baking sheet. Transfer the baking sheet to the freezer and freeze until the watermelon is solid, about 2 hours.

2. Working in batches, transfer the watermelon cubes to a blender or food processor and puree until smooth.

3. Divide the puree among two loaf pans (or put it all in one deep baking dish), packing it down as you add more on top.

4. Transfer the pans to the freezer. Freeze until the sorbet is scoopable, 1 to 2 hours more. To serve, scoop the sorbet into dishes and eat immediately.

Note: The information shown is Edamam's estimate based on available ingredients and preparation. It should not be considered a substitute for a professional nutritionist's advice.


One-Ingredient Watermelon Sorbet

It&rsquos that time of year again. You know, when you&rsquove stopped blow-drying your hair, you&rsquore hardly wearing shoes and you haven&rsquot turned on your oven in weeks. We have an even better way to cool off, and it&rsquos called one-ingredient watermelon sorbet. It sounds too good to be true, but we promise it&rsquos not.

Just freeze a cubed watermelon until it&rsquos solid, blend it into a smooth puree, pack the puree into a pan and then freeze again. Before you know it, the sorbet is ready to scoop and enjoy, and you didn&rsquot even have to fuss with simple syrup. We predict you&rsquoll be making this one all summer long. Psst: We think seeded watermelons have better flavor, but if you can&rsquot be bothered with seeds, pick one that&rsquos seedless. Not sure how to cube a watermelon? Use our guide.

1 ripe medium watermelon, peeled, cubed and seeded

1. Arrange the watermelon cubes in an even layer on a baking sheet. Transfer the baking sheet to the freezer and freeze until the watermelon is solid, about 2 hours.

2. Working in batches, transfer the watermelon cubes to a blender or food processor and puree until smooth.

3. Divide the puree among two loaf pans (or put it all in one deep baking dish), packing it down as you add more on top.

4. Transfer the pans to the freezer. Freeze until the sorbet is scoopable, 1 to 2 hours more. To serve, scoop the sorbet into dishes and eat immediately.

Note: The information shown is Edamam's estimate based on available ingredients and preparation. It should not be considered a substitute for a professional nutritionist's advice.


One-Ingredient Watermelon Sorbet

It&rsquos that time of year again. You know, when you&rsquove stopped blow-drying your hair, you&rsquore hardly wearing shoes and you haven&rsquot turned on your oven in weeks. We have an even better way to cool off, and it&rsquos called one-ingredient watermelon sorbet. It sounds too good to be true, but we promise it&rsquos not.

Just freeze a cubed watermelon until it&rsquos solid, blend it into a smooth puree, pack the puree into a pan and then freeze again. Before you know it, the sorbet is ready to scoop and enjoy, and you didn&rsquot even have to fuss with simple syrup. We predict you&rsquoll be making this one all summer long. Psst: We think seeded watermelons have better flavor, but if you can&rsquot be bothered with seeds, pick one that&rsquos seedless. Not sure how to cube a watermelon? Use our guide.

1 ripe medium watermelon, peeled, cubed and seeded

1. Arrange the watermelon cubes in an even layer on a baking sheet. Transfer the baking sheet to the freezer and freeze until the watermelon is solid, about 2 hours.

2. Working in batches, transfer the watermelon cubes to a blender or food processor and puree until smooth.

3. Divide the puree among two loaf pans (or put it all in one deep baking dish), packing it down as you add more on top.

4. Transfer the pans to the freezer. Freeze until the sorbet is scoopable, 1 to 2 hours more. To serve, scoop the sorbet into dishes and eat immediately.

Note: The information shown is Edamam's estimate based on available ingredients and preparation. It should not be considered a substitute for a professional nutritionist's advice.


One-Ingredient Watermelon Sorbet

It&rsquos that time of year again. You know, when you&rsquove stopped blow-drying your hair, you&rsquore hardly wearing shoes and you haven&rsquot turned on your oven in weeks. We have an even better way to cool off, and it&rsquos called one-ingredient watermelon sorbet. It sounds too good to be true, but we promise it&rsquos not.

Just freeze a cubed watermelon until it&rsquos solid, blend it into a smooth puree, pack the puree into a pan and then freeze again. Before you know it, the sorbet is ready to scoop and enjoy, and you didn&rsquot even have to fuss with simple syrup. We predict you&rsquoll be making this one all summer long. Psst: We think seeded watermelons have better flavor, but if you can&rsquot be bothered with seeds, pick one that&rsquos seedless. Not sure how to cube a watermelon? Use our guide.

1 ripe medium watermelon, peeled, cubed and seeded

1. Arrange the watermelon cubes in an even layer on a baking sheet. Transfer the baking sheet to the freezer and freeze until the watermelon is solid, about 2 hours.

2. Working in batches, transfer the watermelon cubes to a blender or food processor and puree until smooth.

3. Divide the puree among two loaf pans (or put it all in one deep baking dish), packing it down as you add more on top.

4. Transfer the pans to the freezer. Freeze until the sorbet is scoopable, 1 to 2 hours more. To serve, scoop the sorbet into dishes and eat immediately.

Note: The information shown is Edamam's estimate based on available ingredients and preparation. It should not be considered a substitute for a professional nutritionist's advice.


One-Ingredient Watermelon Sorbet

It&rsquos that time of year again. You know, when you&rsquove stopped blow-drying your hair, you&rsquore hardly wearing shoes and you haven&rsquot turned on your oven in weeks. We have an even better way to cool off, and it&rsquos called one-ingredient watermelon sorbet. It sounds too good to be true, but we promise it&rsquos not.

Just freeze a cubed watermelon until it&rsquos solid, blend it into a smooth puree, pack the puree into a pan and then freeze again. Before you know it, the sorbet is ready to scoop and enjoy, and you didn&rsquot even have to fuss with simple syrup. We predict you&rsquoll be making this one all summer long. Psst: We think seeded watermelons have better flavor, but if you can&rsquot be bothered with seeds, pick one that&rsquos seedless. Not sure how to cube a watermelon? Use our guide.

1 ripe medium watermelon, peeled, cubed and seeded

1. Arrange the watermelon cubes in an even layer on a baking sheet. Transfer the baking sheet to the freezer and freeze until the watermelon is solid, about 2 hours.

2. Working in batches, transfer the watermelon cubes to a blender or food processor and puree until smooth.

3. Divide the puree among two loaf pans (or put it all in one deep baking dish), packing it down as you add more on top.

4. Transfer the pans to the freezer. Freeze until the sorbet is scoopable, 1 to 2 hours more. To serve, scoop the sorbet into dishes and eat immediately.

Note: The information shown is Edamam's estimate based on available ingredients and preparation. It should not be considered a substitute for a professional nutritionist's advice.


One-Ingredient Watermelon Sorbet

It&rsquos that time of year again. You know, when you&rsquove stopped blow-drying your hair, you&rsquore hardly wearing shoes and you haven&rsquot turned on your oven in weeks. We have an even better way to cool off, and it&rsquos called one-ingredient watermelon sorbet. It sounds too good to be true, but we promise it&rsquos not.

Just freeze a cubed watermelon until it&rsquos solid, blend it into a smooth puree, pack the puree into a pan and then freeze again. Before you know it, the sorbet is ready to scoop and enjoy, and you didn&rsquot even have to fuss with simple syrup. We predict you&rsquoll be making this one all summer long. Psst: We think seeded watermelons have better flavor, but if you can&rsquot be bothered with seeds, pick one that&rsquos seedless. Not sure how to cube a watermelon? Use our guide.

1 ripe medium watermelon, peeled, cubed and seeded

1. Arrange the watermelon cubes in an even layer on a baking sheet. Transfer the baking sheet to the freezer and freeze until the watermelon is solid, about 2 hours.

2. Working in batches, transfer the watermelon cubes to a blender or food processor and puree until smooth.

3. Divide the puree among two loaf pans (or put it all in one deep baking dish), packing it down as you add more on top.

4. Transfer the pans to the freezer. Freeze until the sorbet is scoopable, 1 to 2 hours more. To serve, scoop the sorbet into dishes and eat immediately.

Note: The information shown is Edamam's estimate based on available ingredients and preparation. It should not be considered a substitute for a professional nutritionist's advice.



Comments:

  1. Dijin

    I think you are wrong.

  2. Cottus

    For now, I'll just know))))

  3. Chesmu

    For me it is a very interesting topic. Give with you we will communicate in PM.

  4. Rudy

    I apologize that I can not help you. But I am sure that you will find the right solution.

  5. Saxon

    In my opinion, mistakes are made. Let us try to discuss this.

  6. Berend

    I congratulate, what necessary words..., a magnificent idea



Write a message