sz.toflyintheworld.com
New recipes

Secret Summer Returns for Its Second Year at The Foundry

Secret Summer Returns for Its Second Year at The Foundry


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.


New York City’s first and only farm-to-bar cocktail festival returns for a second year

Delicious food and cocktails, stunning décor, and live performances are just some of the things that you can expect at Secret Summer.

Secret Summer, New York City’s first and only farm-to-bar cocktail festival, returns for its second year this Sunday, Aug. 14.

It is described as a “unique food and cocktail experience” that is “all-consuming” and “immersive,” according to the Facebook event page.

The event will feature custom libations, crafted by expert mixologists, made using fresh ingredients from urban farms, live performances, and activities, all housed in lounges designed by Octavia & Brown, which, from the preview photos, scream #aesthetic.

“As guests enter through the tall wrought-iron gates they will be greeted by a troop of singing buskers and proceed into the garden courtyard,” reads the tickets page. From there, guests are free to wander through different tasting rooms curated by brands, including a Woodford Reserve flavor wheel experience, a Herradura living bar, a Polar Seltzer Lounge, and more.

Food vendors that will be present at the event include Van Leeuwen Ice Cream, La Pulperia, Big D’s Grub Truck, and Eddie’s Pizza.

Tickets are still on sale and can be purchased here.


Jason Bourne returns with $60m in opening weekend as Bad Moms delivers

The fifth film in the Bourne franchise was the second-highest opening of the series, behind The Bourne Ultimatum’s $69.3m debut in 2007, the last time Damon appeared as Jason Bourne. Photograph: Jasin Boland/AP

The fifth film in the Bourne franchise was the second-highest opening of the series, behind The Bourne Ultimatum’s $69.3m debut in 2007, the last time Damon appeared as Jason Bourne. Photograph: Jasin Boland/AP

Last modified on Fri 14 Jul 2017 19.57 BST

Between the return of Matt Damon as super spy Jason Bourne, the promise of laughing along with a few fed-up ladies in the raunchy comedy Bad Moms and the dark internet thriller Nerve, there was something new for everyone in theaters this weekend.

Even after a nearly 10-year hiatus from the series, Damon still draws a significant audience. His Paul Greengrass-directed sequel raked in a healthy $60m in its opening weekend, according to studio estimates on Sunday. Not adjusted for inflation, it was the second-highest opening of the series, behind The Bourne Ultimatum’s $69.3m debut in 2007, the last time Damon appeared as the Robert Ludlum-authored character.

Universal kept awareness high in the lead-up to the release with airings of the Damon Bourne trilogy on eight of NBCUniversal’s networks. Social media channels also pushed out a video where Damon recaps the previous three films in 90 seconds.

“In the exit polls, the No 1 reason for people checking it out was the previous films,” said Nick Carpou, Universal’s president of domestic distribution. “Audiences were ready for it and satisfied.” According to exit data, audiences were 55% male and 60% over the age of 35.

The original R-rated comedy Bad Moms, from the writers of The Hangover, also had reason to crack open the champagne. The STX Entertainment film, starring Mila Kunis, Kristen Bell and Kathryn Hahn as a trio of moms on the edge, blew past its $20m budget to take in $23.4m in its first days in theaters.

An estimated 82% of the audience was female, and 48% was over 34. Bad Moms earned solid A CinemaScore from first-weekend audiences, indicating that it should continue to gain traction in the coming weeks.

“This was a classic case of counter-programming,” said Paul Dergarabedian, senior media analyst for comScore. “To compete on that level with two of the biggest names in box office history (Bourne and Star Trek) is impressive. It tells you that late in the summer, this is what people are looking for – something different and edgy.”

Bad Moms, which debuted at No 3, barely missed second place to Star Trek Beyond, which fell 59% in its second weekend in theaters with $24m. The Paramount sequel has earned $105.7m to date.

The Secret Life of Pets continues to perform extremely well, taking fourth place with $18.2m even after four weekends in theaters. The Illumination Entertainment and Universal film has earned a total of $296.2m.

In fifth place, the micro-budget thriller Lights Out took in $10.8m. The film cost only $5m to make and has already grossed $42.9m. The youthful thriller Nerve also did well, taking in $15.1m since launching on Wednesday. It earned $9m over the weekend for an eighth-place finish. Starring Dave Franco and Emma Roberts, Nerve cost a reported $20m to make.

Overall, the box office was up nearly 30% from this weekend last year and up 3% for the year.

“This has been a summer with some of the biggest ups and downs that I’ve ever seen,” Dergarabedian said. “This is the late summer push that we’ve all been hoping for.”

Next week should prove even bigger, with the release of the superhero ensemble movie Suicide Squad.


Jason Bourne returns with $60m in opening weekend as Bad Moms delivers

The fifth film in the Bourne franchise was the second-highest opening of the series, behind The Bourne Ultimatum’s $69.3m debut in 2007, the last time Damon appeared as Jason Bourne. Photograph: Jasin Boland/AP

The fifth film in the Bourne franchise was the second-highest opening of the series, behind The Bourne Ultimatum’s $69.3m debut in 2007, the last time Damon appeared as Jason Bourne. Photograph: Jasin Boland/AP

Last modified on Fri 14 Jul 2017 19.57 BST

Between the return of Matt Damon as super spy Jason Bourne, the promise of laughing along with a few fed-up ladies in the raunchy comedy Bad Moms and the dark internet thriller Nerve, there was something new for everyone in theaters this weekend.

Even after a nearly 10-year hiatus from the series, Damon still draws a significant audience. His Paul Greengrass-directed sequel raked in a healthy $60m in its opening weekend, according to studio estimates on Sunday. Not adjusted for inflation, it was the second-highest opening of the series, behind The Bourne Ultimatum’s $69.3m debut in 2007, the last time Damon appeared as the Robert Ludlum-authored character.

Universal kept awareness high in the lead-up to the release with airings of the Damon Bourne trilogy on eight of NBCUniversal’s networks. Social media channels also pushed out a video where Damon recaps the previous three films in 90 seconds.

“In the exit polls, the No 1 reason for people checking it out was the previous films,” said Nick Carpou, Universal’s president of domestic distribution. “Audiences were ready for it and satisfied.” According to exit data, audiences were 55% male and 60% over the age of 35.

The original R-rated comedy Bad Moms, from the writers of The Hangover, also had reason to crack open the champagne. The STX Entertainment film, starring Mila Kunis, Kristen Bell and Kathryn Hahn as a trio of moms on the edge, blew past its $20m budget to take in $23.4m in its first days in theaters.

An estimated 82% of the audience was female, and 48% was over 34. Bad Moms earned solid A CinemaScore from first-weekend audiences, indicating that it should continue to gain traction in the coming weeks.

“This was a classic case of counter-programming,” said Paul Dergarabedian, senior media analyst for comScore. “To compete on that level with two of the biggest names in box office history (Bourne and Star Trek) is impressive. It tells you that late in the summer, this is what people are looking for – something different and edgy.”

Bad Moms, which debuted at No 3, barely missed second place to Star Trek Beyond, which fell 59% in its second weekend in theaters with $24m. The Paramount sequel has earned $105.7m to date.

The Secret Life of Pets continues to perform extremely well, taking fourth place with $18.2m even after four weekends in theaters. The Illumination Entertainment and Universal film has earned a total of $296.2m.

In fifth place, the micro-budget thriller Lights Out took in $10.8m. The film cost only $5m to make and has already grossed $42.9m. The youthful thriller Nerve also did well, taking in $15.1m since launching on Wednesday. It earned $9m over the weekend for an eighth-place finish. Starring Dave Franco and Emma Roberts, Nerve cost a reported $20m to make.

Overall, the box office was up nearly 30% from this weekend last year and up 3% for the year.

“This has been a summer with some of the biggest ups and downs that I’ve ever seen,” Dergarabedian said. “This is the late summer push that we’ve all been hoping for.”

Next week should prove even bigger, with the release of the superhero ensemble movie Suicide Squad.


Jason Bourne returns with $60m in opening weekend as Bad Moms delivers

The fifth film in the Bourne franchise was the second-highest opening of the series, behind The Bourne Ultimatum’s $69.3m debut in 2007, the last time Damon appeared as Jason Bourne. Photograph: Jasin Boland/AP

The fifth film in the Bourne franchise was the second-highest opening of the series, behind The Bourne Ultimatum’s $69.3m debut in 2007, the last time Damon appeared as Jason Bourne. Photograph: Jasin Boland/AP

Last modified on Fri 14 Jul 2017 19.57 BST

Between the return of Matt Damon as super spy Jason Bourne, the promise of laughing along with a few fed-up ladies in the raunchy comedy Bad Moms and the dark internet thriller Nerve, there was something new for everyone in theaters this weekend.

Even after a nearly 10-year hiatus from the series, Damon still draws a significant audience. His Paul Greengrass-directed sequel raked in a healthy $60m in its opening weekend, according to studio estimates on Sunday. Not adjusted for inflation, it was the second-highest opening of the series, behind The Bourne Ultimatum’s $69.3m debut in 2007, the last time Damon appeared as the Robert Ludlum-authored character.

Universal kept awareness high in the lead-up to the release with airings of the Damon Bourne trilogy on eight of NBCUniversal’s networks. Social media channels also pushed out a video where Damon recaps the previous three films in 90 seconds.

“In the exit polls, the No 1 reason for people checking it out was the previous films,” said Nick Carpou, Universal’s president of domestic distribution. “Audiences were ready for it and satisfied.” According to exit data, audiences were 55% male and 60% over the age of 35.

The original R-rated comedy Bad Moms, from the writers of The Hangover, also had reason to crack open the champagne. The STX Entertainment film, starring Mila Kunis, Kristen Bell and Kathryn Hahn as a trio of moms on the edge, blew past its $20m budget to take in $23.4m in its first days in theaters.

An estimated 82% of the audience was female, and 48% was over 34. Bad Moms earned solid A CinemaScore from first-weekend audiences, indicating that it should continue to gain traction in the coming weeks.

“This was a classic case of counter-programming,” said Paul Dergarabedian, senior media analyst for comScore. “To compete on that level with two of the biggest names in box office history (Bourne and Star Trek) is impressive. It tells you that late in the summer, this is what people are looking for – something different and edgy.”

Bad Moms, which debuted at No 3, barely missed second place to Star Trek Beyond, which fell 59% in its second weekend in theaters with $24m. The Paramount sequel has earned $105.7m to date.

The Secret Life of Pets continues to perform extremely well, taking fourth place with $18.2m even after four weekends in theaters. The Illumination Entertainment and Universal film has earned a total of $296.2m.

In fifth place, the micro-budget thriller Lights Out took in $10.8m. The film cost only $5m to make and has already grossed $42.9m. The youthful thriller Nerve also did well, taking in $15.1m since launching on Wednesday. It earned $9m over the weekend for an eighth-place finish. Starring Dave Franco and Emma Roberts, Nerve cost a reported $20m to make.

Overall, the box office was up nearly 30% from this weekend last year and up 3% for the year.

“This has been a summer with some of the biggest ups and downs that I’ve ever seen,” Dergarabedian said. “This is the late summer push that we’ve all been hoping for.”

Next week should prove even bigger, with the release of the superhero ensemble movie Suicide Squad.


Jason Bourne returns with $60m in opening weekend as Bad Moms delivers

The fifth film in the Bourne franchise was the second-highest opening of the series, behind The Bourne Ultimatum’s $69.3m debut in 2007, the last time Damon appeared as Jason Bourne. Photograph: Jasin Boland/AP

The fifth film in the Bourne franchise was the second-highest opening of the series, behind The Bourne Ultimatum’s $69.3m debut in 2007, the last time Damon appeared as Jason Bourne. Photograph: Jasin Boland/AP

Last modified on Fri 14 Jul 2017 19.57 BST

Between the return of Matt Damon as super spy Jason Bourne, the promise of laughing along with a few fed-up ladies in the raunchy comedy Bad Moms and the dark internet thriller Nerve, there was something new for everyone in theaters this weekend.

Even after a nearly 10-year hiatus from the series, Damon still draws a significant audience. His Paul Greengrass-directed sequel raked in a healthy $60m in its opening weekend, according to studio estimates on Sunday. Not adjusted for inflation, it was the second-highest opening of the series, behind The Bourne Ultimatum’s $69.3m debut in 2007, the last time Damon appeared as the Robert Ludlum-authored character.

Universal kept awareness high in the lead-up to the release with airings of the Damon Bourne trilogy on eight of NBCUniversal’s networks. Social media channels also pushed out a video where Damon recaps the previous three films in 90 seconds.

“In the exit polls, the No 1 reason for people checking it out was the previous films,” said Nick Carpou, Universal’s president of domestic distribution. “Audiences were ready for it and satisfied.” According to exit data, audiences were 55% male and 60% over the age of 35.

The original R-rated comedy Bad Moms, from the writers of The Hangover, also had reason to crack open the champagne. The STX Entertainment film, starring Mila Kunis, Kristen Bell and Kathryn Hahn as a trio of moms on the edge, blew past its $20m budget to take in $23.4m in its first days in theaters.

An estimated 82% of the audience was female, and 48% was over 34. Bad Moms earned solid A CinemaScore from first-weekend audiences, indicating that it should continue to gain traction in the coming weeks.

“This was a classic case of counter-programming,” said Paul Dergarabedian, senior media analyst for comScore. “To compete on that level with two of the biggest names in box office history (Bourne and Star Trek) is impressive. It tells you that late in the summer, this is what people are looking for – something different and edgy.”

Bad Moms, which debuted at No 3, barely missed second place to Star Trek Beyond, which fell 59% in its second weekend in theaters with $24m. The Paramount sequel has earned $105.7m to date.

The Secret Life of Pets continues to perform extremely well, taking fourth place with $18.2m even after four weekends in theaters. The Illumination Entertainment and Universal film has earned a total of $296.2m.

In fifth place, the micro-budget thriller Lights Out took in $10.8m. The film cost only $5m to make and has already grossed $42.9m. The youthful thriller Nerve also did well, taking in $15.1m since launching on Wednesday. It earned $9m over the weekend for an eighth-place finish. Starring Dave Franco and Emma Roberts, Nerve cost a reported $20m to make.

Overall, the box office was up nearly 30% from this weekend last year and up 3% for the year.

“This has been a summer with some of the biggest ups and downs that I’ve ever seen,” Dergarabedian said. “This is the late summer push that we’ve all been hoping for.”

Next week should prove even bigger, with the release of the superhero ensemble movie Suicide Squad.


Jason Bourne returns with $60m in opening weekend as Bad Moms delivers

The fifth film in the Bourne franchise was the second-highest opening of the series, behind The Bourne Ultimatum’s $69.3m debut in 2007, the last time Damon appeared as Jason Bourne. Photograph: Jasin Boland/AP

The fifth film in the Bourne franchise was the second-highest opening of the series, behind The Bourne Ultimatum’s $69.3m debut in 2007, the last time Damon appeared as Jason Bourne. Photograph: Jasin Boland/AP

Last modified on Fri 14 Jul 2017 19.57 BST

Between the return of Matt Damon as super spy Jason Bourne, the promise of laughing along with a few fed-up ladies in the raunchy comedy Bad Moms and the dark internet thriller Nerve, there was something new for everyone in theaters this weekend.

Even after a nearly 10-year hiatus from the series, Damon still draws a significant audience. His Paul Greengrass-directed sequel raked in a healthy $60m in its opening weekend, according to studio estimates on Sunday. Not adjusted for inflation, it was the second-highest opening of the series, behind The Bourne Ultimatum’s $69.3m debut in 2007, the last time Damon appeared as the Robert Ludlum-authored character.

Universal kept awareness high in the lead-up to the release with airings of the Damon Bourne trilogy on eight of NBCUniversal’s networks. Social media channels also pushed out a video where Damon recaps the previous three films in 90 seconds.

“In the exit polls, the No 1 reason for people checking it out was the previous films,” said Nick Carpou, Universal’s president of domestic distribution. “Audiences were ready for it and satisfied.” According to exit data, audiences were 55% male and 60% over the age of 35.

The original R-rated comedy Bad Moms, from the writers of The Hangover, also had reason to crack open the champagne. The STX Entertainment film, starring Mila Kunis, Kristen Bell and Kathryn Hahn as a trio of moms on the edge, blew past its $20m budget to take in $23.4m in its first days in theaters.

An estimated 82% of the audience was female, and 48% was over 34. Bad Moms earned solid A CinemaScore from first-weekend audiences, indicating that it should continue to gain traction in the coming weeks.

“This was a classic case of counter-programming,” said Paul Dergarabedian, senior media analyst for comScore. “To compete on that level with two of the biggest names in box office history (Bourne and Star Trek) is impressive. It tells you that late in the summer, this is what people are looking for – something different and edgy.”

Bad Moms, which debuted at No 3, barely missed second place to Star Trek Beyond, which fell 59% in its second weekend in theaters with $24m. The Paramount sequel has earned $105.7m to date.

The Secret Life of Pets continues to perform extremely well, taking fourth place with $18.2m even after four weekends in theaters. The Illumination Entertainment and Universal film has earned a total of $296.2m.

In fifth place, the micro-budget thriller Lights Out took in $10.8m. The film cost only $5m to make and has already grossed $42.9m. The youthful thriller Nerve also did well, taking in $15.1m since launching on Wednesday. It earned $9m over the weekend for an eighth-place finish. Starring Dave Franco and Emma Roberts, Nerve cost a reported $20m to make.

Overall, the box office was up nearly 30% from this weekend last year and up 3% for the year.

“This has been a summer with some of the biggest ups and downs that I’ve ever seen,” Dergarabedian said. “This is the late summer push that we’ve all been hoping for.”

Next week should prove even bigger, with the release of the superhero ensemble movie Suicide Squad.


Jason Bourne returns with $60m in opening weekend as Bad Moms delivers

The fifth film in the Bourne franchise was the second-highest opening of the series, behind The Bourne Ultimatum’s $69.3m debut in 2007, the last time Damon appeared as Jason Bourne. Photograph: Jasin Boland/AP

The fifth film in the Bourne franchise was the second-highest opening of the series, behind The Bourne Ultimatum’s $69.3m debut in 2007, the last time Damon appeared as Jason Bourne. Photograph: Jasin Boland/AP

Last modified on Fri 14 Jul 2017 19.57 BST

Between the return of Matt Damon as super spy Jason Bourne, the promise of laughing along with a few fed-up ladies in the raunchy comedy Bad Moms and the dark internet thriller Nerve, there was something new for everyone in theaters this weekend.

Even after a nearly 10-year hiatus from the series, Damon still draws a significant audience. His Paul Greengrass-directed sequel raked in a healthy $60m in its opening weekend, according to studio estimates on Sunday. Not adjusted for inflation, it was the second-highest opening of the series, behind The Bourne Ultimatum’s $69.3m debut in 2007, the last time Damon appeared as the Robert Ludlum-authored character.

Universal kept awareness high in the lead-up to the release with airings of the Damon Bourne trilogy on eight of NBCUniversal’s networks. Social media channels also pushed out a video where Damon recaps the previous three films in 90 seconds.

“In the exit polls, the No 1 reason for people checking it out was the previous films,” said Nick Carpou, Universal’s president of domestic distribution. “Audiences were ready for it and satisfied.” According to exit data, audiences were 55% male and 60% over the age of 35.

The original R-rated comedy Bad Moms, from the writers of The Hangover, also had reason to crack open the champagne. The STX Entertainment film, starring Mila Kunis, Kristen Bell and Kathryn Hahn as a trio of moms on the edge, blew past its $20m budget to take in $23.4m in its first days in theaters.

An estimated 82% of the audience was female, and 48% was over 34. Bad Moms earned solid A CinemaScore from first-weekend audiences, indicating that it should continue to gain traction in the coming weeks.

“This was a classic case of counter-programming,” said Paul Dergarabedian, senior media analyst for comScore. “To compete on that level with two of the biggest names in box office history (Bourne and Star Trek) is impressive. It tells you that late in the summer, this is what people are looking for – something different and edgy.”

Bad Moms, which debuted at No 3, barely missed second place to Star Trek Beyond, which fell 59% in its second weekend in theaters with $24m. The Paramount sequel has earned $105.7m to date.

The Secret Life of Pets continues to perform extremely well, taking fourth place with $18.2m even after four weekends in theaters. The Illumination Entertainment and Universal film has earned a total of $296.2m.

In fifth place, the micro-budget thriller Lights Out took in $10.8m. The film cost only $5m to make and has already grossed $42.9m. The youthful thriller Nerve also did well, taking in $15.1m since launching on Wednesday. It earned $9m over the weekend for an eighth-place finish. Starring Dave Franco and Emma Roberts, Nerve cost a reported $20m to make.

Overall, the box office was up nearly 30% from this weekend last year and up 3% for the year.

“This has been a summer with some of the biggest ups and downs that I’ve ever seen,” Dergarabedian said. “This is the late summer push that we’ve all been hoping for.”

Next week should prove even bigger, with the release of the superhero ensemble movie Suicide Squad.


Jason Bourne returns with $60m in opening weekend as Bad Moms delivers

The fifth film in the Bourne franchise was the second-highest opening of the series, behind The Bourne Ultimatum’s $69.3m debut in 2007, the last time Damon appeared as Jason Bourne. Photograph: Jasin Boland/AP

The fifth film in the Bourne franchise was the second-highest opening of the series, behind The Bourne Ultimatum’s $69.3m debut in 2007, the last time Damon appeared as Jason Bourne. Photograph: Jasin Boland/AP

Last modified on Fri 14 Jul 2017 19.57 BST

Between the return of Matt Damon as super spy Jason Bourne, the promise of laughing along with a few fed-up ladies in the raunchy comedy Bad Moms and the dark internet thriller Nerve, there was something new for everyone in theaters this weekend.

Even after a nearly 10-year hiatus from the series, Damon still draws a significant audience. His Paul Greengrass-directed sequel raked in a healthy $60m in its opening weekend, according to studio estimates on Sunday. Not adjusted for inflation, it was the second-highest opening of the series, behind The Bourne Ultimatum’s $69.3m debut in 2007, the last time Damon appeared as the Robert Ludlum-authored character.

Universal kept awareness high in the lead-up to the release with airings of the Damon Bourne trilogy on eight of NBCUniversal’s networks. Social media channels also pushed out a video where Damon recaps the previous three films in 90 seconds.

“In the exit polls, the No 1 reason for people checking it out was the previous films,” said Nick Carpou, Universal’s president of domestic distribution. “Audiences were ready for it and satisfied.” According to exit data, audiences were 55% male and 60% over the age of 35.

The original R-rated comedy Bad Moms, from the writers of The Hangover, also had reason to crack open the champagne. The STX Entertainment film, starring Mila Kunis, Kristen Bell and Kathryn Hahn as a trio of moms on the edge, blew past its $20m budget to take in $23.4m in its first days in theaters.

An estimated 82% of the audience was female, and 48% was over 34. Bad Moms earned solid A CinemaScore from first-weekend audiences, indicating that it should continue to gain traction in the coming weeks.

“This was a classic case of counter-programming,” said Paul Dergarabedian, senior media analyst for comScore. “To compete on that level with two of the biggest names in box office history (Bourne and Star Trek) is impressive. It tells you that late in the summer, this is what people are looking for – something different and edgy.”

Bad Moms, which debuted at No 3, barely missed second place to Star Trek Beyond, which fell 59% in its second weekend in theaters with $24m. The Paramount sequel has earned $105.7m to date.

The Secret Life of Pets continues to perform extremely well, taking fourth place with $18.2m even after four weekends in theaters. The Illumination Entertainment and Universal film has earned a total of $296.2m.

In fifth place, the micro-budget thriller Lights Out took in $10.8m. The film cost only $5m to make and has already grossed $42.9m. The youthful thriller Nerve also did well, taking in $15.1m since launching on Wednesday. It earned $9m over the weekend for an eighth-place finish. Starring Dave Franco and Emma Roberts, Nerve cost a reported $20m to make.

Overall, the box office was up nearly 30% from this weekend last year and up 3% for the year.

“This has been a summer with some of the biggest ups and downs that I’ve ever seen,” Dergarabedian said. “This is the late summer push that we’ve all been hoping for.”

Next week should prove even bigger, with the release of the superhero ensemble movie Suicide Squad.


Jason Bourne returns with $60m in opening weekend as Bad Moms delivers

The fifth film in the Bourne franchise was the second-highest opening of the series, behind The Bourne Ultimatum’s $69.3m debut in 2007, the last time Damon appeared as Jason Bourne. Photograph: Jasin Boland/AP

The fifth film in the Bourne franchise was the second-highest opening of the series, behind The Bourne Ultimatum’s $69.3m debut in 2007, the last time Damon appeared as Jason Bourne. Photograph: Jasin Boland/AP

Last modified on Fri 14 Jul 2017 19.57 BST

Between the return of Matt Damon as super spy Jason Bourne, the promise of laughing along with a few fed-up ladies in the raunchy comedy Bad Moms and the dark internet thriller Nerve, there was something new for everyone in theaters this weekend.

Even after a nearly 10-year hiatus from the series, Damon still draws a significant audience. His Paul Greengrass-directed sequel raked in a healthy $60m in its opening weekend, according to studio estimates on Sunday. Not adjusted for inflation, it was the second-highest opening of the series, behind The Bourne Ultimatum’s $69.3m debut in 2007, the last time Damon appeared as the Robert Ludlum-authored character.

Universal kept awareness high in the lead-up to the release with airings of the Damon Bourne trilogy on eight of NBCUniversal’s networks. Social media channels also pushed out a video where Damon recaps the previous three films in 90 seconds.

“In the exit polls, the No 1 reason for people checking it out was the previous films,” said Nick Carpou, Universal’s president of domestic distribution. “Audiences were ready for it and satisfied.” According to exit data, audiences were 55% male and 60% over the age of 35.

The original R-rated comedy Bad Moms, from the writers of The Hangover, also had reason to crack open the champagne. The STX Entertainment film, starring Mila Kunis, Kristen Bell and Kathryn Hahn as a trio of moms on the edge, blew past its $20m budget to take in $23.4m in its first days in theaters.

An estimated 82% of the audience was female, and 48% was over 34. Bad Moms earned solid A CinemaScore from first-weekend audiences, indicating that it should continue to gain traction in the coming weeks.

“This was a classic case of counter-programming,” said Paul Dergarabedian, senior media analyst for comScore. “To compete on that level with two of the biggest names in box office history (Bourne and Star Trek) is impressive. It tells you that late in the summer, this is what people are looking for – something different and edgy.”

Bad Moms, which debuted at No 3, barely missed second place to Star Trek Beyond, which fell 59% in its second weekend in theaters with $24m. The Paramount sequel has earned $105.7m to date.

The Secret Life of Pets continues to perform extremely well, taking fourth place with $18.2m even after four weekends in theaters. The Illumination Entertainment and Universal film has earned a total of $296.2m.

In fifth place, the micro-budget thriller Lights Out took in $10.8m. The film cost only $5m to make and has already grossed $42.9m. The youthful thriller Nerve also did well, taking in $15.1m since launching on Wednesday. It earned $9m over the weekend for an eighth-place finish. Starring Dave Franco and Emma Roberts, Nerve cost a reported $20m to make.

Overall, the box office was up nearly 30% from this weekend last year and up 3% for the year.

“This has been a summer with some of the biggest ups and downs that I’ve ever seen,” Dergarabedian said. “This is the late summer push that we’ve all been hoping for.”

Next week should prove even bigger, with the release of the superhero ensemble movie Suicide Squad.


Jason Bourne returns with $60m in opening weekend as Bad Moms delivers

The fifth film in the Bourne franchise was the second-highest opening of the series, behind The Bourne Ultimatum’s $69.3m debut in 2007, the last time Damon appeared as Jason Bourne. Photograph: Jasin Boland/AP

The fifth film in the Bourne franchise was the second-highest opening of the series, behind The Bourne Ultimatum’s $69.3m debut in 2007, the last time Damon appeared as Jason Bourne. Photograph: Jasin Boland/AP

Last modified on Fri 14 Jul 2017 19.57 BST

Between the return of Matt Damon as super spy Jason Bourne, the promise of laughing along with a few fed-up ladies in the raunchy comedy Bad Moms and the dark internet thriller Nerve, there was something new for everyone in theaters this weekend.

Even after a nearly 10-year hiatus from the series, Damon still draws a significant audience. His Paul Greengrass-directed sequel raked in a healthy $60m in its opening weekend, according to studio estimates on Sunday. Not adjusted for inflation, it was the second-highest opening of the series, behind The Bourne Ultimatum’s $69.3m debut in 2007, the last time Damon appeared as the Robert Ludlum-authored character.

Universal kept awareness high in the lead-up to the release with airings of the Damon Bourne trilogy on eight of NBCUniversal’s networks. Social media channels also pushed out a video where Damon recaps the previous three films in 90 seconds.

“In the exit polls, the No 1 reason for people checking it out was the previous films,” said Nick Carpou, Universal’s president of domestic distribution. “Audiences were ready for it and satisfied.” According to exit data, audiences were 55% male and 60% over the age of 35.

The original R-rated comedy Bad Moms, from the writers of The Hangover, also had reason to crack open the champagne. The STX Entertainment film, starring Mila Kunis, Kristen Bell and Kathryn Hahn as a trio of moms on the edge, blew past its $20m budget to take in $23.4m in its first days in theaters.

An estimated 82% of the audience was female, and 48% was over 34. Bad Moms earned solid A CinemaScore from first-weekend audiences, indicating that it should continue to gain traction in the coming weeks.

“This was a classic case of counter-programming,” said Paul Dergarabedian, senior media analyst for comScore. “To compete on that level with two of the biggest names in box office history (Bourne and Star Trek) is impressive. It tells you that late in the summer, this is what people are looking for – something different and edgy.”

Bad Moms, which debuted at No 3, barely missed second place to Star Trek Beyond, which fell 59% in its second weekend in theaters with $24m. The Paramount sequel has earned $105.7m to date.

The Secret Life of Pets continues to perform extremely well, taking fourth place with $18.2m even after four weekends in theaters. The Illumination Entertainment and Universal film has earned a total of $296.2m.

In fifth place, the micro-budget thriller Lights Out took in $10.8m. The film cost only $5m to make and has already grossed $42.9m. The youthful thriller Nerve also did well, taking in $15.1m since launching on Wednesday. It earned $9m over the weekend for an eighth-place finish. Starring Dave Franco and Emma Roberts, Nerve cost a reported $20m to make.

Overall, the box office was up nearly 30% from this weekend last year and up 3% for the year.

“This has been a summer with some of the biggest ups and downs that I’ve ever seen,” Dergarabedian said. “This is the late summer push that we’ve all been hoping for.”

Next week should prove even bigger, with the release of the superhero ensemble movie Suicide Squad.


Jason Bourne returns with $60m in opening weekend as Bad Moms delivers

The fifth film in the Bourne franchise was the second-highest opening of the series, behind The Bourne Ultimatum’s $69.3m debut in 2007, the last time Damon appeared as Jason Bourne. Photograph: Jasin Boland/AP

The fifth film in the Bourne franchise was the second-highest opening of the series, behind The Bourne Ultimatum’s $69.3m debut in 2007, the last time Damon appeared as Jason Bourne. Photograph: Jasin Boland/AP

Last modified on Fri 14 Jul 2017 19.57 BST

Between the return of Matt Damon as super spy Jason Bourne, the promise of laughing along with a few fed-up ladies in the raunchy comedy Bad Moms and the dark internet thriller Nerve, there was something new for everyone in theaters this weekend.

Even after a nearly 10-year hiatus from the series, Damon still draws a significant audience. His Paul Greengrass-directed sequel raked in a healthy $60m in its opening weekend, according to studio estimates on Sunday. Not adjusted for inflation, it was the second-highest opening of the series, behind The Bourne Ultimatum’s $69.3m debut in 2007, the last time Damon appeared as the Robert Ludlum-authored character.

Universal kept awareness high in the lead-up to the release with airings of the Damon Bourne trilogy on eight of NBCUniversal’s networks. Social media channels also pushed out a video where Damon recaps the previous three films in 90 seconds.

“In the exit polls, the No 1 reason for people checking it out was the previous films,” said Nick Carpou, Universal’s president of domestic distribution. “Audiences were ready for it and satisfied.” According to exit data, audiences were 55% male and 60% over the age of 35.

The original R-rated comedy Bad Moms, from the writers of The Hangover, also had reason to crack open the champagne. The STX Entertainment film, starring Mila Kunis, Kristen Bell and Kathryn Hahn as a trio of moms on the edge, blew past its $20m budget to take in $23.4m in its first days in theaters.

An estimated 82% of the audience was female, and 48% was over 34. Bad Moms earned solid A CinemaScore from first-weekend audiences, indicating that it should continue to gain traction in the coming weeks.

“This was a classic case of counter-programming,” said Paul Dergarabedian, senior media analyst for comScore. “To compete on that level with two of the biggest names in box office history (Bourne and Star Trek) is impressive. It tells you that late in the summer, this is what people are looking for – something different and edgy.”

Bad Moms, which debuted at No 3, barely missed second place to Star Trek Beyond, which fell 59% in its second weekend in theaters with $24m. The Paramount sequel has earned $105.7m to date.

The Secret Life of Pets continues to perform extremely well, taking fourth place with $18.2m even after four weekends in theaters. The Illumination Entertainment and Universal film has earned a total of $296.2m.

In fifth place, the micro-budget thriller Lights Out took in $10.8m. The film cost only $5m to make and has already grossed $42.9m. The youthful thriller Nerve also did well, taking in $15.1m since launching on Wednesday. It earned $9m over the weekend for an eighth-place finish. Starring Dave Franco and Emma Roberts, Nerve cost a reported $20m to make.

Overall, the box office was up nearly 30% from this weekend last year and up 3% for the year.

“This has been a summer with some of the biggest ups and downs that I’ve ever seen,” Dergarabedian said. “This is the late summer push that we’ve all been hoping for.”

Next week should prove even bigger, with the release of the superhero ensemble movie Suicide Squad.


Watch the video: Shinnok and Scorpion NEW Clip - Mortal Kombat Legends: Battle of the Realms